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lj west diamonds

A diamond as rare as you.

For centuries, natural color diamonds have been regarded as the world’s most sought-after gems, from collectors to royalty. Diamonds so rare that they are only discovered in a few locations on earth, they are likened to works of art, hidden treasures and rare books.

One of the exciting factors involved in natural color diamonds is the origin of how they get their unique colors, where they are found and why they are so unique.

Rare Multi-Color Diamonds part of the L.J. West Diamonds collection.

Rare Multi-Color Diamonds part of the L.J. West Diamonds collection.

  • Tiny amounts of nitrogen created yellow and orange shades.
  • The element boron created blues.
  • Hydrogen causes the color violet to appear.
  • Tremendous pressure occasionally would realign or spiral the diamond’s crystal structure, creating red, pink, purple and brown diamonds.
  • Millions of years of natural radiation produced green diamonds.

Color diamonds have been around since the beginning of diamonds discovered approximately 3000 years ago in India; it is only the last decade where the desire and appeal for them have entered the consumer market. The growing awareness of rarity and value have created increased demand for natures most special diamonds At auction natural color diamonds are exceeding record prices with the 14.62 carats Oppenheimer blue diamond selling for an impressive $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016. This blue diamond was the largest vivid blue diamond ever to sell at auction and holds the current record for highest price paid for any jewel at auction.

In 2014, the 12.03 fancy vivid blue “Blue Moon of Josephine” diamond sold for $48.4 million and still holds the current price per carat record for any public sale at auction at $4 million per carat. In 2015, a collector paid US$28,523,925.00 for a 16.08 Fancy Vivid Pink Diamond, setting a new world record for the highest price paid and highest price paid per carat at $1.773,875.00 for a Fancy Vivid Pink diamond.

These values highlight the exceptionally rare stones but are proven examples of the desirability for them.

The 14.62 carats Oppenheimer Blue Diamond (right) $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016, Scott West Patriot Earrings (bottom) featuring rare Argyle Pink and Blue diamonds.

The 14.62 carats Oppenheimer Blue Diamond (right) $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016, Scott West Patriot Earrings (bottom) featuring rare Argyle Pink and Blue diamonds.

Any buyer or collector has a spectrum of color to select from in natural colored diamonds, and there is no right or wrong in choosing what diamond can appeal to your taste. Prices for natural color diamonds can start from $100 up to $1 million per carat plus, the characteristics in determining a stones value can vary with the exceptionally rare stones being valued by rarity, size and color. However, the main reason to own any is all the same – beauty, is the ultimate reason to own a natural color diamond!

A natural color diamond is as rare as you, no color is the same and no diamond is alike. The diamonds can be compared to the endless variety of flowers on our earth, a colorful rainbow in the sky and the unique personalities found all around the world.

Consider finding a color diamond that is as distinctive and alluring as you are. You will not be disappointed in your quest to do this.

Why 2016 was the year of the colored diamond

By Nick Glass, CNN

Updated 5:27 AM ET, Tue December 20, 2016

(CNN) Relatively small, but slowly and perfectly formed over billions of years, the Argyle Violet diamond is so rare in color that it has its own unique diamond classification: "Fancy Deep Grayish Blueish Violet."

It was "a once in a lifetime discovery. I fell in love with it. We had to have it," says Scott West of L.J. West Diamonds Inc. of New York.

Like his father, Larry, and his grandfather Max before him, West is a diamond hunter, searching for the rarest and most unusually colored stones.

His most recent acquisition, the 2.83-carat oval Argyle Violet is being displayed as part of "Diamonds: Rare Brilliance" at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

An exclusive offer

Scott West spends three months every year traveling the world looking for special stones.

The Argyle Violet came from the remote Argyle Mine in North West Australia. Every year for the last 30 years, the mine's owner, Rio Tinto, has invited a select group of buyers to tender for newly discovered stones by sealed bid. It's said to be the most exclusive diamond sale in the world.

This year, there were 63 diamonds on offer, all pink, red or violet.

West says he and his father, Larry, first saw the Argyle Violet in a secure room in Hong Kong in September, and made "multi visits in differing light" before placing their bid in November.

He declined to comment on a Financial Times report that L.J.West's winning bid was more than $10 million for the Argyle Violet and 15 other colored stones, although he did agree that it was "tough" having to make a sealed bid.

The allure of the sparkle

L.J. West claims to have the largest inventory of large colored diamonds in the world with some 2000 stones of all colors, many of them pink.

But, naturally, West remains discreet about money and collectors. Though the company did admit that Halle Berry wore one of their diamond rings (the Pumpkin Diamond, Fancy Vivid Orange, 5.54 carats) when she won her Oscar in 2002.

"The Middle East is a strong market. China continues to grow. The United States is still the strongest market of all," he says.

Article courtesy of CNN

Chong Hing jewelry display 14 million yuan pink diamond

From the New York Choi Wan West family to provide the balance of more than 40 diamond jewelry at the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display. From left to right: jewelry family Gino Di Geso, Scott West, Changxing Jewelry Executive Director Valerie Lee, founder Lee Yu Miao Ling, Paul Sterman, diamond expert Aaron Celestian. (Reporter Yang Qing / photography)

From the New York Choi Wan West family to provide the balance of more than 40 diamond jewelry at the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display. From left to right: jewelry family Gino Di Geso, Scott West, Changxing Jewelry Executive Director Valerie Lee, founder Lee Yu Miao Ling, Paul Sterman, diamond expert Aaron Celestian. (Reporter Yang Qing / photography)

Reporter Yang Qing / San Gabriel City reported

December 17, 2016, 8:32 pm

More than 40 pieces of priceless diamond jewelry in the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display, so that the Southern California Chinese community Christmas and New Year shine. One of the top Zhenhan pink diamond ring up to 14 million yuan, a rare.

"The reason why the Southern California Chinese community chose to display these top treasures, because the Chinese people know a lot of goods," from New York's third generation descendant of the jewelry family Scott West, 50 years ago, we know the diamond is usually pink And blue, and now hope to all the world's top diamond, are introduced to the Chinese community.

The 3000 family of diamond jewelry offered by the West family will be on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History from this weekend until March 2017. Aaron Celestian, deputy curator of the museum, said the Natural History Museum held very few diamond exhibition, this is the largest diamond exhibition in recent years. The last diamond exhibition in 2014, "was only a diamond jewelry display."

Celestian, who works on diamonds and jewels, says that 99% of the museum's diamonds are white, because white is the most traditional and likable. "But it's not the color diamonds that are not popular, It is too rare and rare, very difficult to find.

Yellow, pink, blue, green, red, purple, orange and other colors, including yellow diamonds are often experts called "very rare"; powder , Blue and green diamond as "extremely rare"; red, purple and orange drill for the "top Jane Han."

Celestian said that the color of diamonds is usually divided into light color, color, rich color and brilliant color four levels, the heavier the color, the more valuable. "Celestian said," color diamond jewelry color, two look at the size of three to see cut. He explained that the natural color diamond is precious, because very rare, the production environment at least a few miles below the surface, but also requires very special temperature and light conditions.

Changxing Jewelry gold line, said that although this rare diamond display only two days, but Changxing CEO Valerie Lee as a license gem identification division, ready to provide gemstone identification for the public. At the same time, Changxing also have these top diamonds of the drawings and description, ready to help interested people back to the real parts, so that buyers see.

Article courtesy of World Journal

Spectacular Colored Diamonds On Exhibit At Los Angeles County Natural History Museum

Dec 15, 2016 @ 12:37 PM

By Anthony Demarco - Forbes

The Juliet Pink on display at Diamonds: Rare Brilliance at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

The Juliet Pink on display at Diamonds: Rare Brilliance at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is bringing together rare colored gems never before seen in the United States inside the museum’s Gem and Mineral Hall in an exhibition titled “Diamonds: Rare Brilliance.”

At the exhibition’s center is the “Juliet Pink Diamond,” an extremely rare pink diamond of more than 30 carats, and a Fancy Deep Grayish Bluish Violet named the “Argyle Violet Diamond,” after the Argyle mine in Western Australia where it was discovered in 2015. Through examples, such as the fluorescent lighting of a “Rainbow” diamond necklace and a very rare Victorian Orchid Diamond, the exhibition will attempt to bring to light the rare properties of colored gemstones, the science behind natural colored diamonds, and how the interplay of light and chemistry gives diamonds color.

The Argyle Violet Diamond set in a beautiful platinum diamond setting surrounded by 12 rare vivid pink diamonds. On display at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

The Argyle Violet Diamond set in a beautiful platinum diamond setting surrounded by 12 rare vivid pink diamonds. On display at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

The Diamonds: Rare Brilliance exhibition will open Friday and run through March 19, 2017. The colored gems and jewels in the exhibition are owned by L.J. West Diamonds, which specializes in the sourcing, manufacturing and distribution of colored diamonds. 

The exhibition coincides with the reopening of NHMLA’s Gem and Mineral Store.

Article courtesy of Forbes

30+ CARAT “JULIET PINK” AND RARE “ARGYLE VIOLET” DIAMONDS MAKE U.S. DEBUT

IN DIAMONDS: RARE BRILLIANCE AT THE NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUM OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY

New York, November 28, 2016 — The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) today announced details for its coming exhibition Diamonds: Rare Brilliance, which will bring together rare colored gems never before seen in the United States inside the museum’s renowned Gem and Mineral Hall. At the center of Rare Brilliance will be the “Juliet Pink Diamond,” which is an extremely rare pink diamond of over 30 carats, and a Fancy Deep Grayish Bluish Violet named the “Argyle Violet” after the eponymous Argyle mine in Western Australia, where it was discovered in 2015. Through stunning examples, such as the fluorescent lighting of a “rainbow” diamond necklace and a very rare Victorian Orchid Vivid Purple diamond, the exhibition will bring to light the rare properties of colored gemstones, the science behind natural colored diamonds, and how the interplay of light and chemistry gives diamonds color. Organized in partnership with L.J. West Diamonds, Rare Brilliance will be on view from December 16, 2016, through March 19, 2017.  

The Juliet Pink Diamond - set in a magnificent necklace with marquise, pear and round-cut shape white diamonds

The Juliet Pink Diamond - set in a magnificent necklace with marquise, pear and round-cut shape white diamonds

“We are thrilled to share these gems, which are incredibly rare in color, intensity, quality and size — and so brilliantly fashioned from the original roughs — with museum visitors, providing opportunities to learn about the geology, physics and chemistry behind each diamond’s sparkle and hue,” said Dr. Aaron Celestian, NHM’s Associate Mineralogy Curator. “These jewels, on loan from L.J. West, capture the imagination and will shine amongst the museum’s world-renowned collection of gems and minerals.”

“Throughout history diamonds have been synonymous with love and romance. The Juliet Pink captures this connection with its vibrant, strong pink color that is both alluring and seductive. After understanding the stone’s importance and color we decided to name the stone the ‘Juliet Pink Diamond,’ as the stone captivates passion and ultimate beauty.” – Scott West, the vice president of L.J. West Diamonds.

The Juliet Pink Diamond, which will be set in a necklace with marquise, pear and round-cut white diamonds totaling 98.70 carats for the exhibition, has been designated a type IIa diamond by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) for its remarkable chemical purity and clarity. Natural colored diamonds are a strikingly rare phenomenon, occurring in an estimated one out of every 10,000 gems, and the precise science behind individual colors remains a mystery.

The Rainbow Necklace – a glorious and brilliant design that features over more than 100 rare natural color diamonds from the vast color spectrum

The Rainbow Necklace – a glorious and brilliant design that features over more than 100 rare natural color diamonds from the vast color spectrum

In addition to the Juliet Pink Diamond, Diamonds: Rare Brilliance will introduce U.S. audiences to one of the world’s rarest diamonds — a Fancy Deep Grayish Bluish Violet named the “Argyle Violet” after the Argyle mine in Western Australia. There are no other known diamonds of this combination of colors or with the same clarity and size, and it is the largest Violet to be discovered in the Argyle Diamond Mine. The 9.17 original rough stone was an unusual shape characterized by deep grooves and an uneven surface. After more than 80 hours of carving and polishing, the diamond on view in NHM’s Gem Vault is a 2.83-carat oval that is set in a designer ring surrounded by Argyle Vivid Pink Diamonds.

The Argyle Violet – an historic diamond, the its 2.83-carat oval shape is making it the largest violet diamond unearthed from the Argyle diamond mine

The Argyle Violet – an historic diamond, the its 2.83-carat oval shape is making it the largest violet diamond unearthed from the Argyle diamond mine

 

“We are so pleased to be able to share these exceptional stones with the public through the Rare Brilliance exhibition at the Natural History Museum of LA,” Scott West from L.J. West Diamonds said. “Just as the ring and necklace settings provide a backdrop to highlight the brilliance of the cut stones, the excellent company of NHM’s Gem and Mineral Hall collection will provide the perfect context for these rare and important diamonds.”
The Victorian Orchid Vivid Purple Diamond - Fancy Vivid Purple fashioned in a cushion-cut shaped at a noteworthy 1.64 carats

The Victorian Orchid Vivid Purple Diamond - Fancy Vivid Purple fashioned in a cushion-cut shaped at a noteworthy 1.64 carats

The NHM Gem and Mineral Hall
The world-renowned, 6,000-square-foot Gem and Mineral Hall at NHM opened in 1978 and is one of the finest permanent exhibit halls of gems and minerals in the world. The Hall houses a selection of the Museum’s extensive collection — displaying more than 2,000 spectacular specimens within two large galleries — which as a whole includes more than 150,000 specimens and is the largest in the western United States. The NHM Mineral Sciences Department curates the museum’s world-class collection of minerals, rocks, gems, ores, and meteorites, and it conducts research focusing on furthering scientific understanding of these materials. The department actively maintains the Gem and Mineral Hall and provides general and scientific programming through the Museum’s Gem & Mineral Council.

Details -

The Juliet Pink Diamond – The exceptional gem is a Fancy Intense Pink diamond, VVS2. Cut from an estimated 90-carat rough from South Africa, the rare gem is fashioned in an oval-cut shape at a noteworthy 30.03 carats and is set in a magnificent necklace with marquise, pear and round-cut shape white diamonds, VVS E-F totaling 98.70 carats.

The Argyle Violet – an historic diamond, the its 2.83-carat oval shape is making it the largest violet diamond unearthed from the Argyle diamond mine, polished from an extraordinary 9.17-carat rough diamond. An impossible rarity, the Argyle Violet possesses the unique color grading of Fancy Deep Grayish Bluish Violet, and it headlines the 2016 Argyle Pink Diamonds Signature Tender.

The Rainbow Necklace – a glorious and brilliant design that features over more than 100 rare natural color diamonds from the vast color spectrum. The necklace features radiant-cut shape multi-color diamonds at a noteworthy 35.93-carat weight and is set in a custom, one- of- a- kind 18-karatK white gold arch necklace. The necklace took over 5 years to assemble as collecting the diamonds of similar shape and size was extremely miraculous occurrence.

The Victorian Orchid Vivid Purple Diamond – The Victorian Orchid is an extremely rare gem; the diamond is one of the rarest stones currently worldwide because of– due to its unique color. The Victorian Orchid is a Fancy Vivid Purple diamond, SI2. This rare gem is fashioned in a cushion-cut shaped at a noteworthy 1.64 carats and is set in a flower designer ring with a match pair of kite- shape diamonds ofs 0.42 carats.platinum ring setting.

Visitor Information
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90007
www.nhm.org
 
Group Visits  

Groups of 10 or more people receive discounted rates on Museum admission. Group tickets available now by calling (213) 763-3218 or by emailing groupsalesNH@nhm.org for reservations and more information.

Membership

Tickets to the exhibition are free for NHM members. To become a member, visit nhm.org/membership.

About the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is located at 900 Exposition Blvd., Los Angeles. It is open daily 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Museum was the first dedicated museum building in Los Angeles, opening its doors in 1913. It has amassed one of the world’s most extensive and valuable collections of natural and cultural history — with more than 35 million objects, some as old as 4.5 billion years. The Natural History Family of Museums includes the NHM, the La Brea Tar Pits and Museum (Hancock Park/Mid-Wilshire), and the William S. Hart Park and Museum (Newhall, California). The Family of Museums serves more than 1 million families and visitors annually and is a national leader in research, exhibitions and education.

About L.J. West Diamonds
The journey for L.J. West Diamonds spans over five decades and three generations, and it continues to this day. L.J. West has established itself as one of the world’s most distinguished houses for some of the most rare and important exotic Natural Fancy Color Diamonds to have ever been unearthed.

Advocates for the collectors whose treasures we provide. L.J. West is an expert in every phase of the jewelry process – from sourcing to the cutting, polishing and final design. Each exceptional jewel is carefully set to become a unique work of art.

Blue Belles

Joyce Kauf of Rapaport Magazine

Blue diamonds have been stealing the spotlight as prices skyrocket.

Blue Diamonds have become celebrities on the auction scene with all the attendant fame. The fan fare continues this month with an 8.01-carat fancy vivid blue diamond ring by Cartier, named The Sky Blue Diamond, set to be auctioned at Sotheby’s Geneva. But what accounts for the soaring interest and stratospheric prices that these diamonds command in today’s market? From gemologists to diamond brokers to the heads of jewelry sales at the two major auction houses and an industry expert, the answer can be summed up in two words: extremely rare.

A rare Natural Intense Blue Diamond set in a white diamond necklace by Scott West by L.J. West Diamonds

A rare Natural Intense Blue Diamond set in a white diamond necklace by Scott West by L.J. West Diamonds

“more and more people are discovering the beauty of a blue diamond,”
— Larry West

“There is so much more buzz now. There is more awareness of how rare these diamonds are,”explains Larry West,president of L.J.West Diamonds, a color diamond specialist based in New York City. “Previously, information about these exotic stones was only available to the most involved collectors.But now there are more discussions within the high-end jewelry trade.”And while collectors might consider a blue diamond the ultimate investment, “more and more people are discovering the beauty of a blue diamond,” says West, who admits to being“passionate”about these diamonds.

“Perhaps one in 10,000 exhibits any color. A diamond with any evidence of blue color—even if the color is very faint—is less than one-tenth of 1 percent of what would be mined in one year.” Historically, some blue diamonds were discovered in the Golconda region in India; the Hope Diamond has been traced to that area.However, the only source to produce a very small but consistent supply of blue diamonds is the Cullinan Mine in South Africa,owned by Petra Diamonds.

 

 


 

L.J. West Diamonds purchases the argyle violet diamond

Rio Tinto’s Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender delivers record result 7 November 2016

Rio Tinto’s spectacular 2016 Pink Diamonds Tender collection of 63 rare pink, red and violet diamonds from its Argyle mine has delivered a record result, reflecting strong global demand for these increasingly rare diamonds. Known as The Chroma Collection, the 2016 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender comprised the highest quality, size and colour composition in the Tender’s 32 year history and was highly sought after, with winners from 10 countries including a strong representation from the sophisticated US collector market.
The 2016 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender achieved the highest average price per carat since the Tender began in 1984.

Rio Tinto Diamonds general manager of sales Patrick Coppens said “We are delighted with the results of this year’s historic collection. Argyle’s pink, red and violet Tender diamonds are in a class of their own in terms of rarity, beauty and provenance. These natural coloured diamonds are truly beyond rare.”

The 2.83-carat Argyle Violet, is the largest and most valuable violet diamond recovered to date from the Argyle mine

The 2.83-carat Argyle Violet, is the largest and most valuable violet diamond recovered to date from the Argyle mine

The dazzling centrepiece of the collection, the 2.83-carat Argyle Violet, is the largest and most valuable violet diamond recovered to date from the Argyle mine in the remote east Kimberley region of Western Australia. The Argyle Violet was secured by US based coloured diamond specialist, L.J. West Diamonds Inc, which plans to showcase the historic diamond at the Diamonds: Rare Brilliance exhibition at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County in December 2016. President of L.J. West Diamonds Inc Larry West said “The Argyle Violet is an incomparable diamond that forms an important addition to our Art of Nature collection of rare gems. It is a truly unique treasure that we are proud to be exhibiting as one of the finest examples of a historic fancy colour diamond.”

Over the past 15 years the value of Argyle pink diamonds sold at Tender have appreciated over 300 percent. Argyle Pink Diamonds manager Josephine Johnson said “The market fundamentals for pink diamonds -strong demand as a result of extremely limited supply - continue to support their significant value appreciation.“

Rio Tinto’s Argyle mine produces virtually the entire world’s supply of rare pink diamonds, with the finest from a full year’s production showcased in the annual Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender.

The 2016 Tender was the first to comprise diamonds solely from Argyle’s underground mine.

The Chroma Collection is announced for this year's Argyle Pink Diamond Tender 2016

Rio Tinto’s Argyle Pink Diamonds business has unveiled the largest violet diamond recovered from the Argyle mine in Western Australia.

The 2.83 carat polished oval shaped diamond, known as The Argyle Violet, will be the dazzling centrepiece of the 2016 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender, the annual showcase of the rarest diamonds from the Argyle mine.

The Argyle Violet

The Argyle Violet

Argyle Pink Diamonds manager Josephine Johnson said “We are very excited to announce this historic diamond ahead of our Tender launch. This stunning violet diamond will capture the imagination of the world’s leading collectors and connoisseurs.”

More than 90 per cent of the world’s rare pink diamonds come from the Argyle mine and it is the only source of hydrogen- rich violet diamonds. Violet diamonds are seldom seen and in 32 years Argyle has produced only 12 carats of polished violet diamonds for its iconic Tender.

The Argyle Violet was polished in Western Australia by one of Argyle’s master polishers, Richard How Kim Kam, from a 9.17 carat rough diamond discovered in 2015. The Argyle Violet has been assessed by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) as a notable diamond with the colour grade of Fancy Deep Greyish Bluish Violet.

Information courtesy of Rio Tinto

The Irresistible Allure of Natural Color Diamonds

In the world of jewels, nothing compares to the sparkle and allure of a natural diamond or a beautiful colored gemstone. For discerning buyers who appreciate both sparkle and color, natural color diamonds are the perfect addition to any jewelry wardrobe.

Fascination with color is found in ancient history, so it should come as no surprise that we
are still drawn towards colorful jewels today, whether in making a fashion statement or wearing
a treasured jewel. Many famous natural color diamonds have a rich history, such as with the Blue Tavernier that traveled through several incarnations of re-cutting, under different names, over centuries. Today, it is known as the Hope Diamond, the world’s largest deep blue diamond at 42.52-carat, on display at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. The diamond got its name after it surfaced in 1839 in the gem collection catalog of a well-known gem collector, Henry Philip Hope. While many people think of natural color diamonds as those with historic significance, today’s jewelry designers are using them to add pizazz to their jewelry designs. Natural color diamonds are certainly among the rarest gems mined on Earth, with only one found in 10,000 stones. Scott West of LJ West Diamonds based in New York describes his vision of color diamonds:

“In the world of luxury products, natural color diamonds bear comparison to works of art, hidden
treasures, and rare books. They speak the language of exclusivity, desirability, and collectability.”

When color diamonds come to mind, many people think of famous diamonds that sell at auction
for incredibly high prices, however; more retailers are adding natural color diamond jewelry to their bridal and fine jewelry lines. The bridal market is known for demanding the authenticity of a diamond, and in recent years has seen a surge in preference for color diamond engagement rings. Millennials are part of the reason for the increase in natural color diamond sales as they are looking for something different fromtheir parents’ traditional diamond engagement ring. In her latest publication on diamonds, gem and jewelry expert Antoinette Matlins wrote, “Of all
the gems on earth, nothing surpasses the palette ofnatural color diamonds for beauty, distinctiveness, and desirability” (Diamonds Buying Guide, 4th Edition).

Some of the better known natural color diamonds are the yellow and brown stones. Pink diamonds come in pastel shades to deep raspberry colors. Aside from their extraordinary color, pink diamonds gained popularity with celebrities, such as Jennifer Lopez, who received a pink diamond ring from former beau Ben Affleck.

Natural color diamonds are also found in a variety of intensities in orange, green, blue, purple and red. Red is considered the most rare, but famous diamonds can be found in all colors. The NCDIA
website contains information on some of the most famous color diamonds ever found.
Regardless of the main body color, natural color diamonds are known for modified colors and complementary colors. To explain these terms, Thomas Gelb, of Gelb Gemological Consulting advises jewelers that, “A large percentage of diamonds that receive a certificate from a gem lab have more than one word in their color description.” Modifiers might be described on a certificate as bluish gray or grayish blue, while complementary colors might be described as orangey pink or pinkish orange. NCDIA has published information for retailers on how to understand natural color diamond grading.

It’s important for retailers to be able to explain to clients that not all natural color diamonds come in vivid or intense colors. Fancy and fancy light color diamonds, as well as those with modified colors and complementary colors, are just as beautiful as other colored jewels.

The world of Natural Color Diamonds

For fancy-color diamonds, color far surpasses the other “Cs” (clarity, cut, and carat weight) when establishing value. Therefore, it is critical to understand color appearances and how they affect color grades and descriptions. While everyone thinks they understand color, for most it is an intuitive response rather than a true knowledge of the ordering of color appearances.

Color is described using three attributes:

  • Hue (the aspect that permits an object to be classified as red, green, blue, violet, or anything in between)

  • Tone (the relative lightness or darkness)

  • Saturation (the relative strength or weakness)

The color appearance of a gem is the result of a combination of these three attributes. The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) system for color grading colored diamonds uses 27 hues, which are indicated on the hue circle chart. Some of these 27 hue names include modifiers, such as purplish pink. (See below)

A modifier in a hue name (such as yellowish green or orangy yellow) does not mean a lack of purity in the color.

For color grading, colored diamonds are placed face- up in a grooved, matte-white, non-fluorescent plastic tray within a controlled environment —a viewing box that eliminates visual distractions and shields external light. GIA also requires a standard geometry between the diamond, the light source, and the observer. The light source is positioned directly above the diamond, and the observer views it approximately perpendicular to the table facet.

The GIA grading terminology uses a combination of fancy grades and color descriptions to identify a colored diamond’s characteristic color. A fancy grade represents the combined effect of tone and saturation on the color of a diamond. These grades correspond to regions of tone and saturation in color space and vary by hue, since different colors reach their highest saturation at different levels. The color descriptions accompanying a fancy grade are determined by the hue, and by the tone and saturation of the hue. In each instance, the fancy grades and color descriptions represent a range of color appearances.

Exceptionally Rare Pink Diamond Sold For $31.6M During Auction

One of the world’s most extraordinary diamonds, the “Unique Pink”, was recently purchased at a Sotheby’s auction in Geneva for the hefty price of $31.6 million. This makes the particularly rare 15.38-karat pear-shaped pink diamond one of the costliest pink diamond to ever be sold.

The auction house, who are unable to release the purchaser’s identity, took the bid over the phone from a private Asian buyer.

The “Unique Pink” has a simple ring design. Sotheby’s International Jewelry Worldwide Chairman David Bennett said the color of this diamond is amazing, and it’s hard to picture any other diamond with a pink color as vivid as the “Unique Pink”.

In 2015, Christie’s auction sold the “Sweet Josephine” pink diamond for $28.05 million. The buyer was Joseph Lau, a Hong Kong billionaire, who bought the 16.08-karat diamond for his daughter Josephine when she was seven. 

The sale of the “Unique Pink” diamond surpasses Christie’s record.

Still, the recently sold pink diamond doesn’t make it the most expensive to ever have been sold. In 2010, Sotheby’s sold the 24.78-karat “Graff Pink” diamond for the whooping price of $46.2 million.

A day after the sale of the “Unique Pink”, Lau came back to the Sotheby’s auction to buy his daughter the “Blue Moon of Josephine”, a 12.03-karat blue sparkler for nearly $50 million. The $48.5 million price makes the diamond one of the most expensive in the world.

Still, it doesn’t beat Christie’s auction May 18 sale of the “Oppenheimer Blue” 14.62-karat vivid blue diamond, which was purchased from a private collector for $57.5 million. The sale of the “Oppenheimer Blue” makes it the most expensive diamond to be sold in the world. 

Image courtesy of Sotheby's

Image courtesy of Sotheby's

The Blue Moon Diamond sold for a record of $48.26 million

The “Blue Moon” diamond has been sold for a record $48.26 million (48.6 CHF) in Geneva, according to auction house Sotheby’s. The sale price is a record for any gemstone and also per carat, a spokesman said. Sotheby’s describes it as a 12.03-carat fancy vivid blue internally flawless diamond.

It has now been announced that the buyer of the blue diamond, as well as the 16.08 ct cushion-cut Fancy Vivid pink diamond that sold for $28.55m at Christie’s Geneva Magnificent Jewels auction earlier this week, is Hong-Kong based billionaire fugitive Joseph Lau Luen-hung. Lau is listed by Forbes as the sixth richest man in Hong Kong and 114th wealthiest globally, with estimated assets worth US$9.8 billion as of November.

The “Sweet Josephine” diamond sold for &28.55m at Christie’s Geneva Magnificent Jewels auction.

The Blue Moon Diamond - Image courtesy of Sotheby's

The Blue Moon Diamond - Image courtesy of Sotheby's

The “Blue Moon” diamond has been sold for a record 48.26 million in Geneva – The Fancy Vivid Blue Internally Flawless Diamond is truly a wonder of the world.

“It is a new record price for any gemstone and per carat,” David Bennett, worldwide chairman of Sotheby’s international jewellery division, told a packed showroom in Geneva that erupted into applause.

The Hong Kong buyer promptly renamed both stones after his 7 year old daughter, “The Blue Moon of Josephine”, Bennett told reporters, noting that it had also set a world record for any jewel at more than $4 million per carat.

At rival Christie’s on Tuesday, a large diamond of a rare pink hue fetched 28.725 million Swiss francs ($28.55 million).

Christie’s said that the stone, named “The Sweet Josephine” by the Hong Kong-based Chinese client who bought it, set a world record for any pink diamond ever offered at auction.

Information courtesy of (Sotheby’s, Christies, Reuters)