MIT Art-Science project makes a $2 million dollar diamond disappear!

A 16 carat fancy vivid yellow diamond under carbon nanotube - image courtesy of Diemut Strebe

A 16 carat fancy vivid yellow diamond under carbon nanotube - image courtesy of Diemut Strebe

Cambridge, MA and New York, NY, August 29, 2019 — The MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) and the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) will present The Redemption of Vanity, created by artist Diemut Strebe in collaboration with MIT scientist Brian Wardle and his lab, on view at the New York Stock Exchange September 13, 2019 - November 25, 2019. For the work, a 16.78 carat natural yellow diamond valued at $2 million from L.J.West was coated using a new procedure of generating carbon nanotubes (CNTs), recently measured to be the blackest black ever created, which makes the diamond seem to disappear into an invisible void.
The patented carbon nanotube technology (CNT) absorbs more than 99.96% of light and was developed by Professor Wardle and his necstlab lab at MIT.
“Any object covered with this CNT material loses all its plasticity and appears entirely flat, abbreviated/reduced to a black silhouette. In outright contradiction to this we see that a diamond, while made of the very same element (carbon) performs the most intense reflection of light on earth. Because of the extremely high light absorbtive qualities of the CNTs, any object, in this case a large diamond coated with CNT’s, becomes a kind of black hole absent of shadows,“ explains Strebe. “The unification of extreme opposites in one object and the particular aesthetic features of the CNTs caught my imagination for this art project.”
“Strebe’s art-science collaboration caused us to look at the optical properties of our new CNTgrowth, and we discovered that these particular CNTs are blacker than all other reported materials by an order of magnitude across the visible spectrum”, says Wardle. The MIT team is offering the process for any artist to use. “We do not believe in exclusive ownership of any material or idea for any artwork and have opened our method to any artist,” say Strebe and Wardle.
“The project explores material and immaterial value attached to objects and concepts in reference to luxury, society and to art. We are presenting the literal devaluation of a diamond, which is highly symbolic and of high economic value. It presents a challenge to art market mechanisms on the one hand, while expressing at the same time questions of the value of art in a broader way. In this sense it manifests an inquiry into the significance of the value of objects of art and the art market,” says Strebe. “We are honored to present this work at The New York Stock Exchange, which I believe to be a most fitting location to consider the ideas embedded in The Redemption of Vanity.” “The New York Stock Exchange, a center of financial and technological innovation for 227 years, is the perfect venue to display Diemut Strebe and Professor Brian Wardle’s collaboration.
Their work brings together cutting-edge nanotube technology and a natural diamond, which is a symbol of both value and longevity,” said John Tuttle, NYSE Group Vice Chairman & Chief Commercial Officer.
“We welcome all scientists and artists to venture into the world of natural color diamonds. The Redemption of Vanity exemplifies the bond between art, science, and luxury. The 16-carat vivid yellow diamond in the exhibit spent millions of years in complete darkness, deep below the earth's surface. It was only recently unearthed — a once-in-a-lifetime discovery of exquisite size and color. Now the diamond will relive its journey to darkness as it is covered in the blackest of materials. Once again, it will become a reminder that something rare and beautiful can exist even in darkness,” said Larry West.
The “disappearing” diamond in The Redemption of Vanity is a $2 Million Fancy Vivid Yellow SI1 (GIA), Radiant shape, from color diamond specialist, L.J. West Diamonds Inc. of New York. The Redemption of Vanity, conceived by Diemut Strebe, has been realized with Brian L. Wardle, Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Director of necstlab and Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium and his team Drs. Luiz Acauan and Estelle Cohen, in conjunction with Strebe’s residency at MIT supported by the Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST).

ABOUT THE ARTISTS

Diemut Strebe is a conceptual artist based in Boston, MA and a MIT CAST Visiting Artist. She has collaborated with several MIT faculty, including Noam Chomsky and Robert Langer on Sugababe (2014), Litmus (2014) and Yeast Expression (2015); Seth Lloyd and Dirk Englund on Wigner’s Friends (2014); Alan Guth on Plötzlich! (2018); researchers in William Tisdale’s Lab on The Origin of the Works of Art (2018); Regina Barzilay and Elchanan Mossel on The Prayer (2019); and Ken Kamrin and John Brisson on The Gymnast (2019). Strebe is represented by the Ronald Feldman Gallery.
Brian L. Wardle is a Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at MIT and the director of the necstlab research group and MIT’s Nano-Engineered Composite aerospace STructures (NECST) Consortium. Wardle previously worked with CAST Visiting Artist Trevor Paglen on The Last Pictures project (2012).

ABOUT THE MIT CENTER FOR ART, SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY

A major cross-school initiative, the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) creates new opportunities for art, science and technology to thrive as interrelated, mutually informing modes of exploration, knowledge and discovery. CAST’s multidisciplinary platform presents performing and visual arts programs, supports research projects for artists working with science and engineering labs, and sponsors symposia, classes, workshops, design studios, lectures and publications. The Center is funded in part by a generous grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Evan Ziporyn is the Faculty Director and Leila W. Kinney is the Executive Director.
Since its inception in 2012, CAST has been the catalyst for more than 150 artist residencies and collaborative projects with MIT faculty and students, including numerous cross-disciplinary courses, workshops, concert series, multimedia projects, lectures and symposia. The visiting artists program is a cornerstone of CAST’s activities, which encourages cross-fertilization among disciplines and intensive interaction with MIT’s faculty and students. More info at https://arts.mit.edu/cast/ .

HISTORY OF VISITING ARTISTS AT MIT

Since the late 1960s, MIT has been a leader in integrating the arts and pioneering a model for collaboration among artists, scientists and engineers in a research setting. CAST’s Visiting Artists Program brings internationally acclaimed artists to engage with MIT’s creative community in ways that are mutually enlightening for the artists and for faculty, students and research staff at the Institute. Artists who have worked extensively at MIT include Mel Chin, Olafur Eliasson, Rick Lowe, Vik Muniz, Trevor Paglen, Tomás Saraceno, Maya Beiser, Agnieszka Kurant, and Anicka Yi.

ABOUT L.J. WEST DIAMONDS

L.J. West Diamonds is a three generation natural color diamond wholesaler founded in the late 1970’s by Larry J. West and based in New York City. L.J. West has established itself as one of the world’s prominent houses for some of the most rare and important exotic natural fancy color diamonds to have ever been unearthed. This collection includes a vast color spectrum of rare pink, blue, yellow, green, orange and red diamonds. L.J. West is an expert in every phase of the jewelry process – from sourcing to the cutting, polishing and final design. Each exceptional jewel is carefully set to become a unique work of art.
The Redemption of Vanity is on view at the New York Stock Exchange by appointment only. Press viewing: September 13, 2019 at 3pm New York Stock Exchange, 11 Wall Street, New York, NY 10005 RSVP required. Please check-in at the blue tent at 2 Broad Street (at the corner of Wall and Broad Streets).
All guests are required to show a government issued photo ID and go through airport-like security upon entering the NYSE. NYSE follows a business casual dress code - jeans & sneakers are not permitted.

Media contacts: Leah Talatinian, Arts at MIT leaht@mit.edu | 617-253-5351 Gino DiGeso, LJ West Diamonds gino@ljwestdiamonds.com | 212-997-0940

Rio Tinto announces its 2019 rare red and pink diamonds!

2019 Argyle Tender Hero stones (image courtesy of Rio Tinto)

2019 Argyle Tender Hero stones (image courtesy of Rio Tinto)

Rio Tinto announced today its annual showcase of the world’s rarest pink and red diamonds in an exclusive preview at the Argyle mine site in the east Kimberley region of Western Australia.

The 64-diamond collection, including three Fancy Red diamonds and weighing 56.28 carats in total, make up the 2019 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender.

“Rio Tinto’s Argyle mine is the first and only ongoing source of rare pink diamonds in history. With the lifecycle of this extraordinary mine approaching its end, we have seen, and continue to see, unstoppable demand for these truly limited-edition diamonds and strong value appreciation.”

The 2019 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender collection, titled “The Quest for the Absolute” comprises six hero diamonds:
Lot 1: Argyle Enigma™,1.75 carat modified radiant Fancy Red diamond
Lot 2: Argyle Amari™, 1.48 carat heart shaped Fancy Vivid Purplish Pink diamond
Lot 3: Argyle Elysian™, 1.20 carat modified cushion shaped Fancy Vivid Pink diamond
Lot 4: Argyle Verity™,1.37 carat oval shaped Fancy Vivid Purplish Pink diamond
Lot 5: Argyle Opus™, 2.01 carat round shaped Fancy Intense Pink diamond
Lot 6: Argyle Avenoir™, 1.07 carat oval shaped Fancy Red diamond

The 2019 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender is being showcased in Perth, Hong Kong and New York, with bids closing on 9 October 2019.

A new deep blue diamond unveiled!

April 17, 2019

A a super rare "Fancy Deep Blue" diamond weighing more than 20 carats was unveiled Wednesday from Botswana — the largest natural blue diamond discovery that has ever been made in the country. The marvelous diamond exceeds the clarity and purity its world-famous predecessor, the Hope Diamond. 

The oval-shaped diamond was discovered as a 41.11 carat rough stone. It was then cut and polished, retaining 20.46 carats.

Blue diamonds of such size are very uncommon and through out history have only sporadically been found.

Botswana unveiled the 'Okavango Blue,' a rare blue diamond weighing more than 20 carats and the largest blue diamond discovery ever made in the country. (Photo Credit: Okavango Diamond Company)

Botswana unveiled the 'Okavango Blue,' a rare blue diamond weighing more than 20 carats and the largest blue diamond discovery ever made in the country. (Photo Credit: Okavango Diamond Company)

The Pink Legacy Diamond breaks records at auction

The Pink Legacy - Image courtesy of Getty

The Pink Legacy - Image courtesy of Getty

The Pink Legacy a 18.96 carat rare fancy vivid pink emerald cut vs1 diamond type IIa, sold at Christie's Magnificent Jewels auction on November 13th, 2018, the marvelous rare pink diamonds was purchased by Harry Winston. The New York based retailer claimed by the Swatch Group set a world record cost for the 18.96-carat extravagant clear pink jewel, buying it for 50,375,000 Swiss Francs, about the comparable to $50-million. Instantly after the deal, Harry Winston's CEO Nayla Hayek, girl of the late Swatch author Nicolas Hayek, renamed the stone The Winston Pink Legacy.

The phenomenal diamond once claimed by the Oppenheimers, the family behind the DeBeers precious stone organization.

Article information courtesy of Christie’s

3.47 Carat Blue Diamond Breaks World Record

3.47 Carat Intense Blue Diamond - image courtesy of Sotheby’s

3.47 Carat Intense Blue Diamond - image courtesy of Sotheby’s

A cut-cornered rectangular step-cut fancy intense blue diamond weighing 3.47 carats set a price-per-carat world record for a blue diamond after it sold for $1.9-M/carat to reach almost $6.7-M at Sotheby’s Magnificent Jewels Auction.

The gem’s final price nearly 3X’d Sotheby’s (NYSE:BID) pre-sale estimate of between $2 and 2.5-M and pushed up the auction final results to $26.2-M. The blue stone was previously owned by an anonymous Midwestern family.

In total, the fine jewelry broker garnered $34-M across its New York Spring auctions Sotheby’s said in an e-Mail.

According to Sotheby’s, buyers from all over the world flooded New York emptied their wallets by acquiring a 72.96-carat diamond bracelet for $1.4-M and a 13.70-carat Tiffany & Co. (NYSE:TIF) diamond ring for $1.2-M.

L.J. West Diamonds launches the Australian tour of the Scott West jewellery collection in collaboration with Linney’s and Calleija with in-store debuts of the Argyle Violet and Argyle Thea.

The Argyle Violet, a 2.83 carat Fancy Deep Greyish Bluish Violet diamond

The Argyle Violet, a 2.83 carat Fancy Deep Greyish Bluish Violet diamond

Thursday, October 12, 2017: New York. – Scott West by L.J. West Diamonds announces the Australian Pink Diamond Tour for the month of October to debut the largest collection of exquisite fancy coloured diamonds and diamond jewellery ever publicly exhibited in the Southern Hemisphere and will make its international debut at luxury jewellers Linneys Perth & Calleija Marina Mirage, Main Beach, Gold Coast, Australia. The first stop will be in Western Australia at Linneys Crown Metropol showroom, the collection will be unveiled for the very first time from 13 – 15 October, before traveling to Sydney for private viewings and to Calleija’s Gold Coast location.

Featuring the finest coloured diamonds from the Argyle diamond mine and across the globe, this exclusive showcase represents rarity never before seen. Its presence in Perth, Sydney and Gold coast places Australia firmly on the map of fine jewellery destinations.

The collection includes more than 60 fine jewellery pieces and important fancy coloured diamonds. The Argyle Violet™, an incredible gem, which was the Hero stone of the 2016 Argyle Tender, is the highlight of the collection. The Argyle Violet, a 2.83 carat Fancy Deep Greyish Bluish Violet diamond recovered from Rio Tinto’s Argyle mine in the east Kimberley region of Western Australia, is now in a stunning piece of jewellery surrounded by vivid pink diamonds fresh off it’s exhibition at the Museum of Natural History in Los Angeles.

The collection also features the Argyle Thea™, a 2.24ct Fancy Vivid Purplish Pink diamond which was a signature diamond from the 2016 Tender now set in a classical platinum ring designed by Scott West.

Linneys Director David Fardon commented “We are delighted to present such a significant collection of coloured diamond jewellery to our clients and this is the first time in Australia we have seen a jewellery collection valued in excess of $100 million.” The rare pink diamonds from Argyle are highly collectable and have continued to appreciate as the mine moves closer to the end of its mine life.

Scott West, Vice President of L.J. West Diamonds comments “After nearly 30 years of collecting rare and exotic colour diamonds, we are deeply honoured to bring home the largest collection of Argyle pink diamonds from North America to Australia in a grand showcase along with some of the most prestigious colours in all of colour diamonds.”

For further information contact:

Gino Di Geso
Director of Marketing
gino@ljwestdiamonds.com
O. 212-997-0940
LJ West Diamonds, Inc

Argyle Thea™, a 2.24ct Fancy Vivid Purplish Pink diamond

Argyle Thea™, a 2.24ct Fancy Vivid Purplish Pink diamond

Argyle unveils the 2017 Signature Tender

Rio Tinto has unveiled the largest Fancy Red diamond in the history of its Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender, during a world exclusive preview in New York.

The 2.11 carat polished radiant cut diamond, known as The Argyle Everglow™, is the dazzling centrepiece of the 2017 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender – an annual showcase of the rarest diamonds from Rio Tinto’s Argyle mine.

Rio Tinto Copper & Diamonds chief executive Arnaud Soirat said “We are delighted to announce this historic diamond at our Tender preview, a testament to the unique Argyle ore-body that continues to produce the world’s rarest gems.”

Unprecedented in size, colour and clarity, The Argyle Everglow™ has been assessed by the Gemological Institute of America (GIA) as a notable diamond with a grade of Fancy Red VS2.

In the 33-year history of the Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender there have been less than 20 carats of Fancy Red certified diamonds sold.

Argyle Pink Diamonds manager Josephine Johnson said “The Argyle Everglow™ represents rarity within rarity and will drive global demand from collectors and connoisseurs in search of the incomparable.”

The hero cast of the 2017 Argyle Tender! - Image courtesy of Argyle Pink Diamonds

The hero cast of the 2017 Argyle Tender! - Image courtesy of Argyle Pink Diamonds

The 2017 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender is named ‘Custodians of Rare Beauty’ in honour of its rich provenance and honourable pedigree. The 58 diamonds in the Tender weigh a total of 49.39 carats – including four Fancy Red diamonds, four Purplish Red diamonds, two Violet diamonds, and one Blue diamond.

The collection comprises five “hero” diamonds selected for their unique beauty and named to ensure there is a permanent record of their contribution to the history of the world’s most important diamonds:

• Lot 1: Argyle Everglow™, 2.11 carat radiant shaped Fancy Red diamond
• Lot 2: Argyle Isla™, 1.14 carat radiant shaped Fancy Red diamond
• Lot 3: Argyle Avaline™, 2.42 carat cushion shaped Fancy Purple-Pink diamond
• Lot 4: Argyle Kalina™, 1.50 carat oval shaped Fancy Deep Pink diamond
• Lot 5: Argyle Liberté™, 0.91 carat radiant shaped Fancy Deep Gray-Violet diamond

The 2017 Argyle Pink Diamonds Tender will be showcased in New York, Hong Kong and Perth with bids closing on 11 October 2017.

Historical color diamonds sold at auction - Christies

Historical color diamonds sold at auction

14.62 carats, the breathtaking Oppenheimer Blue vivid diamond. Image courtesy of Christie’s

14.62 carats, the breathtaking Oppenheimer Blue vivid diamond. Image courtesy of Christie’s

The Oppenheimer Blue became the most expensive gemstone ever sold at auction in 2016.

At 14.62 carats, the breathtaking Oppenheimer Blue — named after Sir Philip Oppenheimer of De Beers fame — is the largest Fancy Vivid Blue ever to come to auction. It is the latest in a line of historic blue diamonds to have been auctioned at Christie’s which includes the Tereshchenko in 1984 and the Wittelsbach Blue in 2008.

François Curiel, Chairman of Christie's Asia Pacific and China, observes: ‘Blue diamonds have gained a wider following, not only because they are stunning, but because there are so few of them available in the world. The Oppenheimer Blue is one of the rarest gems in the world. It is the gem of gems.’

The Perfect Pink - Image courtesy of Christie’s

The Perfect Pink - Image courtesy of Christie’s

The Perfect Pink. A superb coloured diamond and diamond ring. Set with a rectangular-shaped fancy intense pink diamond weighing 14.23 carats, flanked on either side by a rectangular-shaped diamond weighing 1.73 and 1.67 carats, mounted in 18k rose and white gold. Sold for: HK$179,860,000 ($23,274,064) on 29 November 2010 at Christie’s in Hong Kong

Since they were first discovered in India, pink diamonds have been considered among the most beautiful of gemstones. At 14.23 carats, The Perfect Pink is particularly rare, with polished pink diamonds of its size and colour virtually unheard of — fewer than 10 per cent of all pink diamonds weigh more than 0.20 carats.

While most pink diamonds show some elements of purple, orange or grey, The Perfect Pink is just that, showing absolutely no trace of secondary colour. Completely devoid of inclusions, the diamond was sold in Hong Kong in 2010 for $23,274,064.

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Image courtesy of Christie’s

This exceptional gem possesses a soft cushion-shaped silhouette with modified cutting style, and is a sensational example of a Fancy Vivid Yellow diamond. Simply set as a ring within a streamlined yellow gold setting, the Fancy Vivid Yellow diamond requires no further ornamentation. To find a stone of approximately 75.56 carats graded a Fancy Vivid Yellow by the GIA is a rare occurrence in today’s marketplace.

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Image courtesy of Christie’s

When it was auctioned in 2013, The Orange was the largest Fancy Vivid Orange diamond ever to have been discovered, weighing approximately 14.82 carats. The GIA commented: ‘In the laboratory’s experience, strongly coloured diamonds in the orange hue range rarely exceed three of four carats in size when polished. This diamond is almost four times larger.’

Termed ‘fire diamonds’ by famous gemologist Edwin Streeter, pure orange diamonds remain incredibly rare, with so few having been graded that the exact cause of their colour remains a mystery. The diamond’s unique nature was reflected in its price, selling for $35,543,804 — more than $15 million above its high estimate.

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Sold in Geneva on 10 November 2015, this cushion-shaped Fancy Vivid Pink diamond is the largest of its kind ever to come to auction, weighing in at 16.08 carats. The stone is set in a ring, and is surrounded by a double row of pavé white diamonds, a third row of small pink diamonds nestled underneath.

‘As large and rare coloured diamonds of this calibre become increasingly hard to locate, this 16.08 carat Fancy Vivid Pink diamond comes to market at a time when great gems are mirroring prices achieved for masterpieces in the world of fine art,’ comments Kadakia. Awarded to just one in 100,000 diamonds, the ‘Fancy Vivid’ status is exceptionally rare, reflecting the depth of the diamond’s straight pink hue.

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Weighing in at 13.22 carats, The Blue was sold as the largest Flawless Fancy Vivid Blue diamond in the world. Set in a ring, the pear-shaped stone came flanked by two pear-shaped white diamonds, weighing approximately 1.00 and 0.96 carats. It was purchased by Harry Winston in Geneva in 2014 for a sum equating to just over $24 million.

Credit - Christies

Sotheby's sells pink, blue diamond earrings for about $51M

ABC News - Sotheby's sold a pair of pear-shaped diamond earrings at a hammer price of about $51 million Tuesday, though the 14.54-carat flawless Fancy Vivid Blue diamond that was the auction's highlight fell short of the expected range.

Sold as separate lots, the "Apollo Blue" and "Artemis Pink" diamonds together cracked the low end of the expected range of $50 million to $70 million, but were a record for earrings sold at auction, Sotheby's said.

The earrings were the standout offerings at a Geneva auction of nearly 400 pieces of jewelry that reaped more than $150 million altogether.

At the hammer price, excluding fees, the Apollo Blue — the largest internally flawless Fancy Vivid Blue ever sold at auction — went for 37 million Swiss francs ($37.5 million), Sotheby's said. The total cost was $42.1 million, including the "buyer's premium."

Auctioneer David Bennett, chairman of Sotheby's international jewelry division, called that a "very healthy price."

The matching, 16-carat pink diamond went for a hammer price of about $13.5 million. Overall, the pair went for a total, including fees, of more than $57 million.

Bennett declined to identify the buyer who snapped up both lots, but the auction house did say the buyer was renaming the gems as "The Memory of Autumn Leaves" for the blue diamond earring and "The Dream of Autumn Leaves" for its pink sister.

A Sotheby's employee displays the Apollo blue diamond and the Artemis pink diamond earrings during a preview at the Sotheby's, in Geneva, Switzerland. Sotheby's sold a pair of pear-shaped diamond earrings at a hammer price of about $51 million Tuesday, May 16, 2017, though the 14.54-carat flawless Fancy Vivid Blue diamond that was the auction's highlight fell short of the expected range.   Image courtesy of Sotheby’s

A Sotheby's employee displays the Apollo blue diamond and the Artemis pink diamond earrings during a preview at the Sotheby's, in Geneva, Switzerland. Sotheby's sold a pair of pear-shaped diamond earrings at a hammer price of about $51 million Tuesday, May 16, 2017, though the 14.54-carat flawless Fancy Vivid Blue diamond that was the auction's highlight fell short of the expected range.

Image courtesy of Sotheby’s

'Pink Star' diamond sells for record $71.2 million at auction

The "Pink Star" weighs 59.60-carats, and is the most valuable polished diamond ever offered at auction. Image courtesy of CNN, Sotheby’s

The "Pink Star" weighs 59.60-carats, and is the most valuable polished diamond ever offered at auction. Image courtesy of CNN, Sotheby’s

Courtesy of CNN

It took nearly two years to cut the Pink Star from a rough diamond. It first appeared in public in 2003 and later became part of an exhibit at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, home of the famous 45.52 carat blue Hope Diamond. It was also displayed at the Natural History Museum in London.

Tuesday's winning bid surpassed the previous world auction record for a pink diamond -- $46.16 million for the 24.78 carat Graff Pink, sold at Sotheby's in Geneva in 2010.

Chow Tai Fook has renamed its new possession the CTF Pink Star in memory of the company's founder and to commemorate the brand's 88th anniversary.

A diamond as rare as you.

For centuries, natural color diamonds have been regarded as the world’s most sought-after gems, from collectors to royalty. Diamonds so rare that they are only discovered in a few locations on earth, they are likened to works of art, hidden treasures and rare books.

One of the exciting factors involved in natural color diamonds is the origin of how they get their unique colors, where they are found and why they are so unique.

Rare Multi-Color Diamonds part of the L.J. West Diamonds collection.

Rare Multi-Color Diamonds part of the L.J. West Diamonds collection.

  • Tiny amounts of nitrogen created yellow and orange shades.
  • The element boron created blues.
  • Hydrogen causes the color violet to appear.
  • Tremendous pressure occasionally would realign or spiral the diamond’s crystal structure, creating red, pink, purple and brown diamonds.
  • Millions of years of natural radiation produced green diamonds.

Color diamonds have been around since the beginning of diamonds discovered approximately 3000 years ago in India; it is only the last decade where the desire and appeal for them have entered the consumer market. The growing awareness of rarity and value have created increased demand for natures most special diamonds At auction natural color diamonds are exceeding record prices with the 14.62 carats Oppenheimer blue diamond selling for an impressive $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016. This blue diamond was the largest vivid blue diamond ever to sell at auction and holds the current record for highest price paid for any jewel at auction.

In 2014, the 12.03 fancy vivid blue “Blue Moon of Josephine” diamond sold for $48.4 million and still holds the current price per carat record for any public sale at auction at $4 million per carat. In 2015, a collector paid US$28,523,925.00 for a 16.08 Fancy Vivid Pink Diamond, setting a new world record for the highest price paid and highest price paid per carat at $1.773,875.00 for a Fancy Vivid Pink diamond.

These values highlight the exceptionally rare stones but are proven examples of the desirability for them.

The 14.62 carats Oppenheimer Blue Diamond (right) $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016, Scott West Patriot Earrings (bottom) featuring rare Argyle Pink and Blue diamonds.

The 14.62 carats Oppenheimer Blue Diamond (right) $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016, Scott West Patriot Earrings (bottom) featuring rare Argyle Pink and Blue diamonds.

Any buyer or collector has a spectrum of color to select from in natural colored diamonds, and there is no right or wrong in choosing what diamond can appeal to your taste. Prices for natural color diamonds can start from $100 up to $1 million per carat plus, the characteristics in determining a stones value can vary with the exceptionally rare stones being valued by rarity, size and color. However, the main reason to own any is all the same – beauty, is the ultimate reason to own a natural color diamond!

A natural color diamond is as rare as you, no color is the same and no diamond is alike. The diamonds can be compared to the endless variety of flowers on our earth, a colorful rainbow in the sky and the unique personalities found all around the world.

Consider finding a color diamond that is as distinctive and alluring as you are. You will not be disappointed in your quest to do this.

Why 2016 was the year of the colored diamond

By Nick Glass, CNN

Updated 5:27 AM ET, Tue December 20, 2016

(CNN) Relatively small, but slowly and perfectly formed over billions of years, the Argyle Violet diamond is so rare in color that it has its own unique diamond classification: "Fancy Deep Grayish Blueish Violet."

It was "a once in a lifetime discovery. I fell in love with it. We had to have it," says Scott West of L.J. West Diamonds Inc. of New York.

Like his father, Larry, and his grandfather Max before him, West is a diamond hunter, searching for the rarest and most unusually colored stones.

His most recent acquisition, the 2.83-carat oval Argyle Violet is being displayed as part of "Diamonds: Rare Brilliance" at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

An exclusive offer

Scott West spends three months every year traveling the world looking for special stones.

The Argyle Violet came from the remote Argyle Mine in North West Australia. Every year for the last 30 years, the mine's owner, Rio Tinto, has invited a select group of buyers to tender for newly discovered stones by sealed bid. It's said to be the most exclusive diamond sale in the world.

This year, there were 63 diamonds on offer, all pink, red or violet.

West says he and his father, Larry, first saw the Argyle Violet in a secure room in Hong Kong in September, and made "multi visits in differing light" before placing their bid in November.

He declined to comment on a Financial Times report that L.J.West's winning bid was more than $10 million for the Argyle Violet and 15 other colored stones, although he did agree that it was "tough" having to make a sealed bid.

The allure of the sparkle

L.J. West claims to have the largest inventory of large colored diamonds in the world with some 2000 stones of all colors, many of them pink.

But, naturally, West remains discreet about money and collectors. Though the company did admit that Halle Berry wore one of their diamond rings (the Pumpkin Diamond, Fancy Vivid Orange, 5.54 carats) when she won her Oscar in 2002.

"The Middle East is a strong market. China continues to grow. The United States is still the strongest market of all," he says.

Article courtesy of CNN