Viewing entries tagged
blue diamonds

3.47 Carat Blue Diamond Breaks World Record

3.47 Carat Intense Blue Diamond - image courtesy of Sotheby’s

3.47 Carat Intense Blue Diamond - image courtesy of Sotheby’s

A cut-cornered rectangular step-cut fancy intense blue diamond weighing 3.47 carats set a price-per-carat world record for a blue diamond after it sold for $1.9-M/carat to reach almost $6.7-M at Sotheby’s Magnificent Jewels Auction.

The gem’s final price nearly 3X’d Sotheby’s (NYSE:BID) pre-sale estimate of between $2 and 2.5-M and pushed up the auction final results to $26.2-M. The blue stone was previously owned by an anonymous Midwestern family.

In total, the fine jewelry broker garnered $34-M across its New York Spring auctions Sotheby’s said in an e-Mail.

According to Sotheby’s, buyers from all over the world flooded New York emptied their wallets by acquiring a 72.96-carat diamond bracelet for $1.4-M and a 13.70-carat Tiffany & Co. (NYSE:TIF) diamond ring for $1.2-M.

Historical color diamonds sold at auction - Christies

Historical color diamonds sold at auction

14.62 carats, the breathtaking Oppenheimer Blue vivid diamond. Image courtesy of Christie’s

14.62 carats, the breathtaking Oppenheimer Blue vivid diamond. Image courtesy of Christie’s

The Oppenheimer Blue became the most expensive gemstone ever sold at auction in 2016.

At 14.62 carats, the breathtaking Oppenheimer Blue — named after Sir Philip Oppenheimer of De Beers fame — is the largest Fancy Vivid Blue ever to come to auction. It is the latest in a line of historic blue diamonds to have been auctioned at Christie’s which includes the Tereshchenko in 1984 and the Wittelsbach Blue in 2008.

François Curiel, Chairman of Christie's Asia Pacific and China, observes: ‘Blue diamonds have gained a wider following, not only because they are stunning, but because there are so few of them available in the world. The Oppenheimer Blue is one of the rarest gems in the world. It is the gem of gems.’

The Perfect Pink - Image courtesy of Christie’s

The Perfect Pink - Image courtesy of Christie’s

The Perfect Pink. A superb coloured diamond and diamond ring. Set with a rectangular-shaped fancy intense pink diamond weighing 14.23 carats, flanked on either side by a rectangular-shaped diamond weighing 1.73 and 1.67 carats, mounted in 18k rose and white gold. Sold for: HK$179,860,000 ($23,274,064) on 29 November 2010 at Christie’s in Hong Kong

Since they were first discovered in India, pink diamonds have been considered among the most beautiful of gemstones. At 14.23 carats, The Perfect Pink is particularly rare, with polished pink diamonds of its size and colour virtually unheard of — fewer than 10 per cent of all pink diamonds weigh more than 0.20 carats.

While most pink diamonds show some elements of purple, orange or grey, The Perfect Pink is just that, showing absolutely no trace of secondary colour. Completely devoid of inclusions, the diamond was sold in Hong Kong in 2010 for $23,274,064.

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Image courtesy of Christie’s

This exceptional gem possesses a soft cushion-shaped silhouette with modified cutting style, and is a sensational example of a Fancy Vivid Yellow diamond. Simply set as a ring within a streamlined yellow gold setting, the Fancy Vivid Yellow diamond requires no further ornamentation. To find a stone of approximately 75.56 carats graded a Fancy Vivid Yellow by the GIA is a rare occurrence in today’s marketplace.

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Image courtesy of Christie’s

When it was auctioned in 2013, The Orange was the largest Fancy Vivid Orange diamond ever to have been discovered, weighing approximately 14.82 carats. The GIA commented: ‘In the laboratory’s experience, strongly coloured diamonds in the orange hue range rarely exceed three of four carats in size when polished. This diamond is almost four times larger.’

Termed ‘fire diamonds’ by famous gemologist Edwin Streeter, pure orange diamonds remain incredibly rare, with so few having been graded that the exact cause of their colour remains a mystery. The diamond’s unique nature was reflected in its price, selling for $35,543,804 — more than $15 million above its high estimate.

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Sold in Geneva on 10 November 2015, this cushion-shaped Fancy Vivid Pink diamond is the largest of its kind ever to come to auction, weighing in at 16.08 carats. The stone is set in a ring, and is surrounded by a double row of pavé white diamonds, a third row of small pink diamonds nestled underneath.

‘As large and rare coloured diamonds of this calibre become increasingly hard to locate, this 16.08 carat Fancy Vivid Pink diamond comes to market at a time when great gems are mirroring prices achieved for masterpieces in the world of fine art,’ comments Kadakia. Awarded to just one in 100,000 diamonds, the ‘Fancy Vivid’ status is exceptionally rare, reflecting the depth of the diamond’s straight pink hue.

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Image courtesy of Christie’s

Weighing in at 13.22 carats, The Blue was sold as the largest Flawless Fancy Vivid Blue diamond in the world. Set in a ring, the pear-shaped stone came flanked by two pear-shaped white diamonds, weighing approximately 1.00 and 0.96 carats. It was purchased by Harry Winston in Geneva in 2014 for a sum equating to just over $24 million.

Credit - Christies

Sotheby's sells pink, blue diamond earrings for about $51M

ABC News - Sotheby's sold a pair of pear-shaped diamond earrings at a hammer price of about $51 million Tuesday, though the 14.54-carat flawless Fancy Vivid Blue diamond that was the auction's highlight fell short of the expected range.

Sold as separate lots, the "Apollo Blue" and "Artemis Pink" diamonds together cracked the low end of the expected range of $50 million to $70 million, but were a record for earrings sold at auction, Sotheby's said.

The earrings were the standout offerings at a Geneva auction of nearly 400 pieces of jewelry that reaped more than $150 million altogether.

At the hammer price, excluding fees, the Apollo Blue — the largest internally flawless Fancy Vivid Blue ever sold at auction — went for 37 million Swiss francs ($37.5 million), Sotheby's said. The total cost was $42.1 million, including the "buyer's premium."

Auctioneer David Bennett, chairman of Sotheby's international jewelry division, called that a "very healthy price."

The matching, 16-carat pink diamond went for a hammer price of about $13.5 million. Overall, the pair went for a total, including fees, of more than $57 million.

Bennett declined to identify the buyer who snapped up both lots, but the auction house did say the buyer was renaming the gems as "The Memory of Autumn Leaves" for the blue diamond earring and "The Dream of Autumn Leaves" for its pink sister.

A Sotheby's employee displays the Apollo blue diamond and the Artemis pink diamond earrings during a preview at the Sotheby's, in Geneva, Switzerland. Sotheby's sold a pair of pear-shaped diamond earrings at a hammer price of about $51 million Tuesday, May 16, 2017, though the 14.54-carat flawless Fancy Vivid Blue diamond that was the auction's highlight fell short of the expected range.   Image courtesy of Sotheby’s

A Sotheby's employee displays the Apollo blue diamond and the Artemis pink diamond earrings during a preview at the Sotheby's, in Geneva, Switzerland. Sotheby's sold a pair of pear-shaped diamond earrings at a hammer price of about $51 million Tuesday, May 16, 2017, though the 14.54-carat flawless Fancy Vivid Blue diamond that was the auction's highlight fell short of the expected range.

Image courtesy of Sotheby’s

A diamond as rare as you.

For centuries, natural color diamonds have been regarded as the world’s most sought-after gems, from collectors to royalty. Diamonds so rare that they are only discovered in a few locations on earth, they are likened to works of art, hidden treasures and rare books.

One of the exciting factors involved in natural color diamonds is the origin of how they get their unique colors, where they are found and why they are so unique.

Rare Multi-Color Diamonds part of the L.J. West Diamonds collection.

Rare Multi-Color Diamonds part of the L.J. West Diamonds collection.

  • Tiny amounts of nitrogen created yellow and orange shades.
  • The element boron created blues.
  • Hydrogen causes the color violet to appear.
  • Tremendous pressure occasionally would realign or spiral the diamond’s crystal structure, creating red, pink, purple and brown diamonds.
  • Millions of years of natural radiation produced green diamonds.

Color diamonds have been around since the beginning of diamonds discovered approximately 3000 years ago in India; it is only the last decade where the desire and appeal for them have entered the consumer market. The growing awareness of rarity and value have created increased demand for natures most special diamonds At auction natural color diamonds are exceeding record prices with the 14.62 carats Oppenheimer blue diamond selling for an impressive $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016. This blue diamond was the largest vivid blue diamond ever to sell at auction and holds the current record for highest price paid for any jewel at auction.

In 2014, the 12.03 fancy vivid blue “Blue Moon of Josephine” diamond sold for $48.4 million and still holds the current price per carat record for any public sale at auction at $4 million per carat. In 2015, a collector paid US$28,523,925.00 for a 16.08 Fancy Vivid Pink Diamond, setting a new world record for the highest price paid and highest price paid per carat at $1.773,875.00 for a Fancy Vivid Pink diamond.

These values highlight the exceptionally rare stones but are proven examples of the desirability for them.

The 14.62 carats Oppenheimer Blue Diamond (right) $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016, Scott West Patriot Earrings (bottom) featuring rare Argyle Pink and Blue diamonds.

The 14.62 carats Oppenheimer Blue Diamond (right) $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016, Scott West Patriot Earrings (bottom) featuring rare Argyle Pink and Blue diamonds.

Any buyer or collector has a spectrum of color to select from in natural colored diamonds, and there is no right or wrong in choosing what diamond can appeal to your taste. Prices for natural color diamonds can start from $100 up to $1 million per carat plus, the characteristics in determining a stones value can vary with the exceptionally rare stones being valued by rarity, size and color. However, the main reason to own any is all the same – beauty, is the ultimate reason to own a natural color diamond!

A natural color diamond is as rare as you, no color is the same and no diamond is alike. The diamonds can be compared to the endless variety of flowers on our earth, a colorful rainbow in the sky and the unique personalities found all around the world.

Consider finding a color diamond that is as distinctive and alluring as you are. You will not be disappointed in your quest to do this.

Chong Hing jewelry display 14 million yuan pink diamond

From the New York Choi Wan West family to provide the balance of more than 40 diamond jewelry at the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display. From left to right: jewelry family Gino Di Geso, Scott West, Changxing Jewelry Executive Director Valerie Lee, founder Lee Yu Miao Ling, Paul Sterman, diamond expert Aaron Celestian. (Reporter Yang Qing / photography)

From the New York Choi Wan West family to provide the balance of more than 40 diamond jewelry at the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display. From left to right: jewelry family Gino Di Geso, Scott West, Changxing Jewelry Executive Director Valerie Lee, founder Lee Yu Miao Ling, Paul Sterman, diamond expert Aaron Celestian. (Reporter Yang Qing / photography)

Reporter Yang Qing / San Gabriel City reported

December 17, 2016, 8:32 pm

More than 40 pieces of priceless diamond jewelry in the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display, so that the Southern California Chinese community Christmas and New Year shine. One of the top Zhenhan pink diamond ring up to 14 million yuan, a rare.

"The reason why the Southern California Chinese community chose to display these top treasures, because the Chinese people know a lot of goods," from New York's third generation descendant of the jewelry family Scott West, 50 years ago, we know the diamond is usually pink And blue, and now hope to all the world's top diamond, are introduced to the Chinese community.

The 3000 family of diamond jewelry offered by the West family will be on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History from this weekend until March 2017. Aaron Celestian, deputy curator of the museum, said the Natural History Museum held very few diamond exhibition, this is the largest diamond exhibition in recent years. The last diamond exhibition in 2014, "was only a diamond jewelry display."

Celestian, who works on diamonds and jewels, says that 99% of the museum's diamonds are white, because white is the most traditional and likable. "But it's not the color diamonds that are not popular, It is too rare and rare, very difficult to find.

Yellow, pink, blue, green, red, purple, orange and other colors, including yellow diamonds are often experts called "very rare"; powder , Blue and green diamond as "extremely rare"; red, purple and orange drill for the "top Jane Han."

Celestian said that the color of diamonds is usually divided into light color, color, rich color and brilliant color four levels, the heavier the color, the more valuable. "Celestian said," color diamond jewelry color, two look at the size of three to see cut. He explained that the natural color diamond is precious, because very rare, the production environment at least a few miles below the surface, but also requires very special temperature and light conditions.

Changxing Jewelry gold line, said that although this rare diamond display only two days, but Changxing CEO Valerie Lee as a license gem identification division, ready to provide gemstone identification for the public. At the same time, Changxing also have these top diamonds of the drawings and description, ready to help interested people back to the real parts, so that buyers see.

Article courtesy of World Journal

Spectacular Colored Diamonds On Exhibit At Los Angeles County Natural History Museum

Dec 15, 2016 @ 12:37 PM

By Anthony Demarco - Forbes

The Juliet Pink on display at Diamonds: Rare Brilliance at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

The Juliet Pink on display at Diamonds: Rare Brilliance at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County is bringing together rare colored gems never before seen in the United States inside the museum’s Gem and Mineral Hall in an exhibition titled “Diamonds: Rare Brilliance.”

At the exhibition’s center is the “Juliet Pink Diamond,” an extremely rare pink diamond of more than 30 carats, and a Fancy Deep Grayish Bluish Violet named the “Argyle Violet Diamond,” after the Argyle mine in Western Australia where it was discovered in 2015. Through examples, such as the fluorescent lighting of a “Rainbow” diamond necklace and a very rare Victorian Orchid Diamond, the exhibition will attempt to bring to light the rare properties of colored gemstones, the science behind natural colored diamonds, and how the interplay of light and chemistry gives diamonds color.

The Argyle Violet Diamond set in a beautiful platinum diamond setting surrounded by 12 rare vivid pink diamonds. On display at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

The Argyle Violet Diamond set in a beautiful platinum diamond setting surrounded by 12 rare vivid pink diamonds. On display at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles

The Diamonds: Rare Brilliance exhibition will open Friday and run through March 19, 2017. The colored gems and jewels in the exhibition are owned by L.J. West Diamonds, which specializes in the sourcing, manufacturing and distribution of colored diamonds. 

The exhibition coincides with the reopening of NHMLA’s Gem and Mineral Store.

Article courtesy of Forbes

Blue Belles

Joyce Kauf of Rapaport Magazine

Blue diamonds have been stealing the spotlight as prices skyrocket.

Blue Diamonds have become celebrities on the auction scene with all the attendant fame. The fan fare continues this month with an 8.01-carat fancy vivid blue diamond ring by Cartier, named The Sky Blue Diamond, set to be auctioned at Sotheby’s Geneva. But what accounts for the soaring interest and stratospheric prices that these diamonds command in today’s market? From gemologists to diamond brokers to the heads of jewelry sales at the two major auction houses and an industry expert, the answer can be summed up in two words: extremely rare.

A rare Natural Intense Blue Diamond set in a white diamond necklace by Scott West by L.J. West Diamonds

A rare Natural Intense Blue Diamond set in a white diamond necklace by Scott West by L.J. West Diamonds

“more and more people are discovering the beauty of a blue diamond,”
— Larry West

“There is so much more buzz now. There is more awareness of how rare these diamonds are,”explains Larry West,president of L.J.West Diamonds, a color diamond specialist based in New York City. “Previously, information about these exotic stones was only available to the most involved collectors.But now there are more discussions within the high-end jewelry trade.”And while collectors might consider a blue diamond the ultimate investment, “more and more people are discovering the beauty of a blue diamond,” says West, who admits to being“passionate”about these diamonds.

“Perhaps one in 10,000 exhibits any color. A diamond with any evidence of blue color—even if the color is very faint—is less than one-tenth of 1 percent of what would be mined in one year.” Historically, some blue diamonds were discovered in the Golconda region in India; the Hope Diamond has been traced to that area.However, the only source to produce a very small but consistent supply of blue diamonds is the Cullinan Mine in South Africa,owned by Petra Diamonds.

 

 


 

The world of Natural Color Diamonds

For fancy-color diamonds, color far surpasses the other “Cs” (clarity, cut, and carat weight) when establishing value. Therefore, it is critical to understand color appearances and how they affect color grades and descriptions. While everyone thinks they understand color, for most it is an intuitive response rather than a true knowledge of the ordering of color appearances.

Color is described using three attributes:

  • Hue (the aspect that permits an object to be classified as red, green, blue, violet, or anything in between)

  • Tone (the relative lightness or darkness)

  • Saturation (the relative strength or weakness)

The color appearance of a gem is the result of a combination of these three attributes. The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) system for color grading colored diamonds uses 27 hues, which are indicated on the hue circle chart. Some of these 27 hue names include modifiers, such as purplish pink. (See below)

A modifier in a hue name (such as yellowish green or orangy yellow) does not mean a lack of purity in the color.

For color grading, colored diamonds are placed face- up in a grooved, matte-white, non-fluorescent plastic tray within a controlled environment —a viewing box that eliminates visual distractions and shields external light. GIA also requires a standard geometry between the diamond, the light source, and the observer. The light source is positioned directly above the diamond, and the observer views it approximately perpendicular to the table facet.

The GIA grading terminology uses a combination of fancy grades and color descriptions to identify a colored diamond’s characteristic color. A fancy grade represents the combined effect of tone and saturation on the color of a diamond. These grades correspond to regions of tone and saturation in color space and vary by hue, since different colors reach their highest saturation at different levels. The color descriptions accompanying a fancy grade are determined by the hue, and by the tone and saturation of the hue. In each instance, the fancy grades and color descriptions represent a range of color appearances.

The Blue Moon Diamond sold for a record of $48.26 million

The “Blue Moon” diamond has been sold for a record $48.26 million (48.6 CHF) in Geneva, according to auction house Sotheby’s. The sale price is a record for any gemstone and also per carat, a spokesman said. Sotheby’s describes it as a 12.03-carat fancy vivid blue internally flawless diamond.

It has now been announced that the buyer of the blue diamond, as well as the 16.08 ct cushion-cut Fancy Vivid pink diamond that sold for $28.55m at Christie’s Geneva Magnificent Jewels auction earlier this week, is Hong-Kong based billionaire fugitive Joseph Lau Luen-hung. Lau is listed by Forbes as the sixth richest man in Hong Kong and 114th wealthiest globally, with estimated assets worth US$9.8 billion as of November.

The “Sweet Josephine” diamond sold for &28.55m at Christie’s Geneva Magnificent Jewels auction.

The Blue Moon Diamond - Image courtesy of Sotheby's

The Blue Moon Diamond - Image courtesy of Sotheby's

The “Blue Moon” diamond has been sold for a record 48.26 million in Geneva – The Fancy Vivid Blue Internally Flawless Diamond is truly a wonder of the world.

“It is a new record price for any gemstone and per carat,” David Bennett, worldwide chairman of Sotheby’s international jewellery division, told a packed showroom in Geneva that erupted into applause.

The Hong Kong buyer promptly renamed both stones after his 7 year old daughter, “The Blue Moon of Josephine”, Bennett told reporters, noting that it had also set a world record for any jewel at more than $4 million per carat.

At rival Christie’s on Tuesday, a large diamond of a rare pink hue fetched 28.725 million Swiss francs ($28.55 million).

Christie’s said that the stone, named “The Sweet Josephine” by the Hong Kong-based Chinese client who bought it, set a world record for any pink diamond ever offered at auction.

Information courtesy of (Sotheby’s, Christies, Reuters)