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green diamonds

A diamond as rare as you.

For centuries, natural color diamonds have been regarded as the world’s most sought-after gems, from collectors to royalty. Diamonds so rare that they are only discovered in a few locations on earth, they are likened to works of art, hidden treasures and rare books.

One of the exciting factors involved in natural color diamonds is the origin of how they get their unique colors, where they are found and why they are so unique.

Rare Multi-Color Diamonds part of the L.J. West Diamonds collection.

Rare Multi-Color Diamonds part of the L.J. West Diamonds collection.

  • Tiny amounts of nitrogen created yellow and orange shades.
  • The element boron created blues.
  • Hydrogen causes the color violet to appear.
  • Tremendous pressure occasionally would realign or spiral the diamond’s crystal structure, creating red, pink, purple and brown diamonds.
  • Millions of years of natural radiation produced green diamonds.

Color diamonds have been around since the beginning of diamonds discovered approximately 3000 years ago in India; it is only the last decade where the desire and appeal for them have entered the consumer market. The growing awareness of rarity and value have created increased demand for natures most special diamonds At auction natural color diamonds are exceeding record prices with the 14.62 carats Oppenheimer blue diamond selling for an impressive $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016. This blue diamond was the largest vivid blue diamond ever to sell at auction and holds the current record for highest price paid for any jewel at auction.

In 2014, the 12.03 fancy vivid blue “Blue Moon of Josephine” diamond sold for $48.4 million and still holds the current price per carat record for any public sale at auction at $4 million per carat. In 2015, a collector paid US$28,523,925.00 for a 16.08 Fancy Vivid Pink Diamond, setting a new world record for the highest price paid and highest price paid per carat at $1.773,875.00 for a Fancy Vivid Pink diamond.

These values highlight the exceptionally rare stones but are proven examples of the desirability for them.

The 14.62 carats Oppenheimer Blue Diamond (right) $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016, Scott West Patriot Earrings (bottom) featuring rare Argyle Pink and Blue diamonds.

The 14.62 carats Oppenheimer Blue Diamond (right) $57,541,779 USD at Christie's in May of 2016, Scott West Patriot Earrings (bottom) featuring rare Argyle Pink and Blue diamonds.

Any buyer or collector has a spectrum of color to select from in natural colored diamonds, and there is no right or wrong in choosing what diamond can appeal to your taste. Prices for natural color diamonds can start from $100 up to $1 million per carat plus, the characteristics in determining a stones value can vary with the exceptionally rare stones being valued by rarity, size and color. However, the main reason to own any is all the same – beauty, is the ultimate reason to own a natural color diamond!

A natural color diamond is as rare as you, no color is the same and no diamond is alike. The diamonds can be compared to the endless variety of flowers on our earth, a colorful rainbow in the sky and the unique personalities found all around the world.

Consider finding a color diamond that is as distinctive and alluring as you are. You will not be disappointed in your quest to do this.

Chong Hing jewelry display 14 million yuan pink diamond

From the New York Choi Wan West family to provide the balance of more than 40 diamond jewelry at the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display. From left to right: jewelry family Gino Di Geso, Scott West, Changxing Jewelry Executive Director Valerie Lee, founder Lee Yu Miao Ling, Paul Sterman, diamond expert Aaron Celestian. (Reporter Yang Qing / photography)

From the New York Choi Wan West family to provide the balance of more than 40 diamond jewelry at the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display. From left to right: jewelry family Gino Di Geso, Scott West, Changxing Jewelry Executive Director Valerie Lee, founder Lee Yu Miao Ling, Paul Sterman, diamond expert Aaron Celestian. (Reporter Yang Qing / photography)

Reporter Yang Qing / San Gabriel City reported

December 17, 2016, 8:32 pm

More than 40 pieces of priceless diamond jewelry in the weekend in San Gabriel Changxing jewelry watches and clocks gold line display, so that the Southern California Chinese community Christmas and New Year shine. One of the top Zhenhan pink diamond ring up to 14 million yuan, a rare.

"The reason why the Southern California Chinese community chose to display these top treasures, because the Chinese people know a lot of goods," from New York's third generation descendant of the jewelry family Scott West, 50 years ago, we know the diamond is usually pink And blue, and now hope to all the world's top diamond, are introduced to the Chinese community.

The 3000 family of diamond jewelry offered by the West family will be on display at the Los Angeles County Museum of Natural History from this weekend until March 2017. Aaron Celestian, deputy curator of the museum, said the Natural History Museum held very few diamond exhibition, this is the largest diamond exhibition in recent years. The last diamond exhibition in 2014, "was only a diamond jewelry display."

Celestian, who works on diamonds and jewels, says that 99% of the museum's diamonds are white, because white is the most traditional and likable. "But it's not the color diamonds that are not popular, It is too rare and rare, very difficult to find.

Yellow, pink, blue, green, red, purple, orange and other colors, including yellow diamonds are often experts called "very rare"; powder , Blue and green diamond as "extremely rare"; red, purple and orange drill for the "top Jane Han."

Celestian said that the color of diamonds is usually divided into light color, color, rich color and brilliant color four levels, the heavier the color, the more valuable. "Celestian said," color diamond jewelry color, two look at the size of three to see cut. He explained that the natural color diamond is precious, because very rare, the production environment at least a few miles below the surface, but also requires very special temperature and light conditions.

Changxing Jewelry gold line, said that although this rare diamond display only two days, but Changxing CEO Valerie Lee as a license gem identification division, ready to provide gemstone identification for the public. At the same time, Changxing also have these top diamonds of the drawings and description, ready to help interested people back to the real parts, so that buyers see.

Article courtesy of World Journal

The world of Natural Color Diamonds

For fancy-color diamonds, color far surpasses the other “Cs” (clarity, cut, and carat weight) when establishing value. Therefore, it is critical to understand color appearances and how they affect color grades and descriptions. While everyone thinks they understand color, for most it is an intuitive response rather than a true knowledge of the ordering of color appearances.

Color is described using three attributes:

  • Hue (the aspect that permits an object to be classified as red, green, blue, violet, or anything in between)

  • Tone (the relative lightness or darkness)

  • Saturation (the relative strength or weakness)

The color appearance of a gem is the result of a combination of these three attributes. The Gemological Institute of America (GIA) system for color grading colored diamonds uses 27 hues, which are indicated on the hue circle chart. Some of these 27 hue names include modifiers, such as purplish pink. (See below)

A modifier in a hue name (such as yellowish green or orangy yellow) does not mean a lack of purity in the color.

For color grading, colored diamonds are placed face- up in a grooved, matte-white, non-fluorescent plastic tray within a controlled environment —a viewing box that eliminates visual distractions and shields external light. GIA also requires a standard geometry between the diamond, the light source, and the observer. The light source is positioned directly above the diamond, and the observer views it approximately perpendicular to the table facet.

The GIA grading terminology uses a combination of fancy grades and color descriptions to identify a colored diamond’s characteristic color. A fancy grade represents the combined effect of tone and saturation on the color of a diamond. These grades correspond to regions of tone and saturation in color space and vary by hue, since different colors reach their highest saturation at different levels. The color descriptions accompanying a fancy grade are determined by the hue, and by the tone and saturation of the hue. In each instance, the fancy grades and color descriptions represent a range of color appearances.