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Natural Color


NATURAL COLOR DIAMONDS

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Natural Color


NATURAL COLOR DIAMONDS

Over billions of years deep with in the earth…

Incredible circumstances created natural color diamonds. Minute amounts of trace elements interacting with carbon atoms brought about the natural color in these diamonds. Tiny amounts of nitrogen created yellow and orange shades. Boron created blues, and hydrogen produced violet. Tremendous pressure occasionally would realign or twist the diamond’s crystal structure, creating red, pink, purple and brown diamonds. Millions of years of natural radiation produced green diamonds with limitless variations in color.

The diamonds featured in the L.J. West Diamonds inventory are sourced from mines around the world, including the Argyle Diamond Mine (Australia), which produces over 90% of the world’s natural pink diamonds; the Cullinan mine (South Africa), the largest current producer of blue diamonds; the Williamson mine (Tanzania); the Rooipoort mine (South Africa); and many more.

L.J. West remains dedicated to the Kimberly Process, never buying or trading rough diamonds from areas where it would support conflict or human distress.

All L.J. West diamonds are certified with a report from the Gemological Institute of America and carefully sourced for quality and desirability.

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Origin


Origin


The diamonds featured in the L.J. West Diamonds inventory are sourced from mines around the world, including the Argyle Diamond Mine (Australia), which produces over 90% of the world’s natural pink diamonds; the Cullinan mine (South Africa), the largest current producer of blue diamonds; the Williamson mine (Tanzania); the Rooipoort mine (South Africa); and many more.

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Rarity


Rarity


For centuries, natural color diamonds have been regarded as the world’s most sought-after gems, from collectors to royalty. For decades the West family has traveled across the world in search of the most exclusive and rare diamonds ever unearthed. With a collection that ranges across the spectrum of color, the diamonds range in exclusivity from a few per year to the largest ever of a particular color.

It is estimated that 1 in 10,000 diamonds mined is a natural color diamond.

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Pink Diamonds


Pink Diamonds


Pink diamonds are different from other fancy colors in that they do not get their color from any trace element such as yellow and blue diamonds do. Instead, after their formation, these stones are subjected to very high temperature and non isotropic stress which deforms the crystal lattice and displaces some of the carbon atoms from their regular positions. It is accepted today that these structural defects are the cause of a diamonds pink hue.

In Pink Diamonds these defects are very obvious and can be seen as "graining lines" with the help of a microscope and in some cases even apparent to the naked eye.

Like other colors GIA grades pink in terms of tone hue and saturation. As tone and saturation increase rarity goes up as well as value. Starting from low tone and saturation and increasing GIA grades pink diamonds as light, fancy light, fancy, fancy intense/ fancy deep, and fancy vivid. Pink diamonds are unique in that when a stone falls into the rare category of extremely high tone and saturation GIA uses the term "fancy RED" to classify it.

Pink diamonds have only been found in a few mines across the world. The rich Golconda region in India and the Minas Gerais region of Brazil produced notable diamonds in the 17th and 18th centuries. Today, the Argyle mine in Western Australia is the source of the vast majority of the world’s supply. It is famous for generating the hugely coveted full- bodied hot pink diamonds.

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Green Diamonds


Green Diamonds


Green diamonds are one of the most difficult diamonds to value and understand on the colored diamond market. The reason for this is the way in which green diamonds are formed. Caused by exposure to natural irradiation during the diamonds formation, the color of green diamonds can either be throughout the stone or just present on the surface.

What expert cutters are now doing is leaving "skin" or surface radiation staining on the stone to give the appearance that the stone is greener than it is. Because the GIA grades color on face up appearance and because the skin is natural there is little indication how the stone appears green.

Generally how one can tell is to view the diamond loose and see how much of the stone is in its rough form, the less the better. Green diamonds with the same GIA grades can be fractions of one another in value because of green "skin". This should not deter a collector from purchasing a skin stone however because a natural green diamond is extremely rare in any form.

Green diamonds are found predominately in regions of Africa and South America. The Dresden Green is the most famous green diamond. Weighing approximately 41 carats, it is often referred to as the cousin of the Hope Diamond for its historical importance.

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Blue Diamonds


Blue Diamonds


Blue diamonds are formed by the concentration of boron in the bonding of atoms. As the amount of boron in a diamond increases so too does the strength of blue. Blue diamonds are almost always type II b, do not contain fluorescence and generally have few imperfections.

Argyle produces another form of blue diamonds of the type Ia type which are sometimes classified as violet by the GIA. These stones share qualities with their argyle pink cousins in that they are generally included and have fluorescence. Their color is caused by the element impurity hydrogen present in their covalent bonding.

GIA grades blue diamonds in terms of tone and saturation. As tone and saturation increase rarity goes up as well as value. Starting from low tone and saturation and increasing GIA grades blue diamonds as light, fancy light, fancy, fancy intense/ fancy deep, and fancy vivid. All categories are very rare and small or large sizes.

The Cullinan mine and Golconda region are the most notable areas where blue diamonds have come from. The most famous blue diamond in history is the 45 carat “Hope Diamond.” In 2008 The Wittelsbach Diamond, a 35.56 carat cushion-shaped fancy deep blue, was purchased at auction for $24 million. Experts compare this stone’s color and characteristics to the famed Hope Diamond.

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Yellow Diamonds


Yellow Diamonds


The vast majority of all diamonds contain some nitrogen. In most yellow diamonds the nitrogen atoms have grouped themselves in very specific ways. This happens during and right after the diamond is formed. These nitrogen arrangements absorb light in the blue region of the spectrum producing a yellow color. Yellow diamonds can contain an orange, green or brown modifying color.

The most notably large and intense yellow diamonds have been discovered primarily in South Africa. The Allnatt, a 101ct cushion shape fancy vivid yellow diamond is perhaps the most significant yellow diamond in history, named after its original owner, Major Allnatt, in the 1950s. One of the largest polished diamonds in the world is the Incomparable, a 407 carat internally flawless brownish yellow diamond. Yellow diamonds account for about 70% of natural color diamonds graded by GIA each year

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Orange Diamonds


Orange Diamonds


The vast majority of all diamonds contain some nitrogen. In orange diamonds the nitrogen atoms have grouped themselves in a very specific way.This happens during and right after the diamond is formed. These nitrogen arrangements absorb light in the blue and yellow region of the spectrum producing an orange color. Orange diamonds may contain a brown, yellow
or pinkish modifying color.

The majority of orange diamonds come from Africa. The interest in this color surged in 1997 with the auction of the Pumpkin Diamond a 5.54 carats Fancy Vivid Orange diamond with a report from the Gemological Institute of America. The Pumpkin was worn by Halle Berry to the 2002 Oscars when she won best actress for Monster’s Ball.

Currently “The Orange” diamond, at 14.82 carats, is listed as the largest Fancy Vivid Orange Diamond in the world.